ART-223534-02) Images of Women in Western Civilization discussions

ART-223534-02) Images of Women in Western Civilization discussions

Discussion one: In this discussion activity, I will model the kind of Leading Discussion exercise that you will be taking on, starting Week 3.Typically, there will be three or more discussion leaders each week, and each leader is to initiate one leading post. For this week, you will see three leading posts and only need to participate in/follow up on discussion under these leading posts.First, as the leader, I focus on a few topics and questions from the assigned readings that I think will help us begin analyzing images of women in ancient times. For example, let's consider some "perspectives" that women's history scholar Sarah Pomeroy (1995) has taken to understand how women were perceived in ancient times. Below are the three Instructor-led discussion prompts:1. Mythology and Stereotypes: While reading Chapter 1, Goddesses and Gods, what sort of images do you think mythology creates for women? Do you think that some of the assumptions or stereotypes toward women might have evolved from mythology? What are the assumptions or stereotypes that you find interesting or problematic?2. Documenting Women's Lives in Ancient Times: As I continue reading Pomeroy's Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves, (from Introduction to Chapter 3), I notice that she points out several reasons why women's creative work and lives are not well recorded throughout history. What are the reasons? How does the lack of sufficient information affect our understanding of women's lives in ancient times? Whose lives get recorded?3. Codes of a Patriarchal Society: To delve deeper into what women's and men's lives were alike in the early Western civilization, please share some particular gender "codes" or "rules" you find in Chapters 2 or 3. Are there any codes or rules you find particularly unexpected or curious? Do you see any codes that have continued to live on and be practiced (directly or indirectly) even today? How does a code reflect the societal needs and context in different times?Throughout the week, join your classmates in discussion of the topics, issues, and questions raised by the discussion leaders; however, please don't be too anxious to respond to all the posts. Choose the ones that you are prepared to answer first and then continue to explore others throughout the week. You may point out additional issues or topics presented in the text, raise more questions, offer additional resources, or provide further insights into women's lives in ancient civilization.Reminder:Be sure to read .esc.edu/mod/page/view.php?id=1644570">Instructions for Student-led and Class Discussions to prepare for this discussion-intensive course. And review discussion evaluation criteria in .esc.edu/mod/page/view.php?id=1644569">Learning Contract page to learn about how your discussion will be evaluated. *Discussion two: (student lead discussion topic as follows)Being a woman in Athens during the classical society certainly did not sound inviting. It appeared as though the women had no influence and were considered a minority to the democracy. Athenian Women were dominated by the male society and their role in this setting was to procreate and produce heirs for the Polis. As girls reached puberty they were usually married off to men much older than themselves (30 years old). Martial considerations were negotiated based on wealth political standings. Marriages made within families such as a first cousin were seen as desired. This way financial resources were kept within the family lineage and there were no trust issues.A dowry was a primary consideration when marrying off a daughter. Interestingly enough the young women of Athens had little say in their societal goingons however when it came to the dowry the women appeared quite attractive to male suitors.Daughters received a share of their family wealth. However the father could ask for the return of his daughter at any time, especially if a divorce took place. The new wife was entitled to the wealth of the family she married into. Without a dowry a marriage was not considered “legal”. Lastly a young Athenian woman that was married would preferably be a virgin, making them more desirable. And the birth of a child, especially a male was considered a goal of the marriage. * discussion three: (student lead discussion topic as follows)As we read, The Roman Matron to The Elusive Women of Classical Antiquity is it uncertain whether any true idea of equality for women emerged? Please share your examples. According to Pomeroy (1995) : Cornelia Africana married Tiberius Gracchus and bore him twelve children, not common at that time in Rome. “Cornelia exercised a profound influence on Roman politics. She was herself educated, and her letters were published” (p150). She is also recognized as she remained faith full to her deceased husband and refused the marriage proposal of King Ptolemy. She is referred to as univira“one man” woman. Why was she idealized?What was the median age for wives in Rome at this time? Why was the age of men greater? The Women of The Roman Lower Classes, did the household duties of female slaves differ from those reviewed in Greece? Could the Lower Class woman of Rome receive education? Who represented the the large part of the working class? Is prostitution in existence at this time?What role of women in the religion of the Rome caught your attention? Were you surprised to read about the crude gestures when the woman passed the Temple of Chastity?The cult of Isis although centered on Egyptian gods & goddess can be entwined, in my opinion, that of Christianity? When Isis was able to resurrect Osiris it reminded me Jesus resurrecting Lazarus a miracle mentioned in the bible John 11. Did anyone else think the same?ReferencePomeroy, S. (1995). Goddesses, whores, wives, and slaves: Women in classical antiquity. New York: Schocken Books. * The discussions are based on the following criteria:
 

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