Power is at its most effective [and potent] when least observable

Power is at its most effective [and potent] when least observable

George, 2005. “Power is at its most effective [and potent] when least observable”. Assess this statement in light of George’s concept of the ‘calibrated coercion’ of the media in Singapore. .0pt;line-height:115%"> Week 3: Politics Barr, 2014. Barr argued that despite the development of other pathways to gain entry into the national elite circle, personal contacts with “Lee [Kuan Yew] or one of his inner circle remained a vital link in the selection and formation process” (p.49). In your sociologically-informed opinion, do you think that this is necessarily the case? What are the other ways that have been employed in the creation and entrenchment of a national elite in Singapore? b. George, 2005. “Power is at its most effective [and potent] when least observable”. Assess this statement in light of George’s concept of the ‘calibrated coercion’ of the media in Singapore. Week 4: Class and Meritocracy a. Chua, 2011. Chua’s asserts that social networks and personal contacts are insignificant in the “highly meritocratic state sector” (p.10). What are the sociological links that can be made between education, meritocracy and the production of an elite class? b. Low, 2014. Low asserts that arguing whether there should be meritocracy or no meritocracy is a “false choice” (p58). To what extent do you agree with Low’s assessment, and how useful or detrimental are the different types of meritocratic systems to Singapore society?
 

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